Analyze Your Search

Hints:

  • Action links for each search result record
    • Bookmark: Allows you to Bookmark the page for easy future retrieval 
    • Email: Opens a pop-up window where you can write a message to the recipient of the email
    • Copy URL: Copies the URL of the requested document for pasting in an email or other document
    • More Info: Shows full summary of content record
  • Saved Searches and Alerts
    • Save your search for later viewing & updates by clicking the blue "Follow" button to the right of the search box. 
Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Related Disorders
  Follow Topic   Edit Search
Your search returned 61 results
from the time period: last 90 days.
Sort by Relevance / Date Group By Journal / No Grouping
1. Squamous-Cell Carcinoma of the Mouth.  
Date: 09/20/2017
The New England journal of medicine
No summary available
Carcinoma (2), Mouth Neoplasms (1), more mentions
Cell
Alterations in transcriptional regulators can orchestrate oncogenic gene expression programs in cancer. Here, we show that the BRG1/BRM-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex, which is mutated in over 20% of human tumors, interacts with EWSR1, a member of a family of proteins with prion-like domains (PrLD) that are frequent partners in oncogenic fusions with transcription factors. In Ewing sarcoma, we find that the BAF complex is recruited by the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein to tumor-specific enhancers and contributes to target gene activation. This process is a neomorphic property of EWS-FLI1 compared to wild-type FLI1 and depends on tyrosine residues that are necessary for phase transitions of the EWSR1 prion-like domain. Furthermore, fusion of short fragments of EWSR1 to FLI1 is sufficient to recapitulate BAF complex retargeting and EWS-FLI1 activities. Our studies thus demonstrate that the physical properties of prion-like domains can retarget critical chromatin regulatory complexes to establish and maintain oncogenic gene expression programs.
Oncology (2)
Neoplasms (5), Ewing Sarcoma (2), Sarcoma (1), more mentions
The Lancet. Oncology 
BACKGROUND: For many years, first-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma has been doxorubicin. This study compared gemcitabine and docetaxel versus doxorubicin as first-line treatment for advanced or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS: The GeDDiS trial was a randomised controlled phase 3 trial done in 24 UK hospitals and one Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK) hospital. Eligible patients had histologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma of Trojani grade 2 or 3, disease progression before enrolment, and no previous chemotherapy for sarcoma or previous doxorubicin for any cancer. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive six cycles of intravenous doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 3 weeks, or intravenous gemcitabine 675 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 and intravenous docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) on day 8 every 3 weeks. Treatment was assigned using a minimisation algorithm incorporating a random element. Randomisation was stratified by age (≤18 years vs >18 years) and histological subtype. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients alive and progression free at 24 weeks in the intention-to-treat population. Adherence to treatment and toxicity were analysed in the safety population, consisting of all patients who received at least one dose of their randomised treatment. The trial was registered with the European Clinical Trials (EudraCT) database (no 2009-014907-29) and with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial registry (ISRCTN07742377), and is now closed to patient entry. FINDINGS: Between Dec 3, 2010, and Jan 20, 2014, 257 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to the two treatment groups (129 to doxorubicin and 128 to gemcitabine and docetaxel). Median follow-up was 22 months (IQR 15·7-29·3). The proportion of patients alive and progression free at 24 weeks did not differ between those who received doxorubicin versus those who received gemcitabine and docetaxel (46·3% [95% CI 37·5-54·6] vs 46·4% [37·5-54·8]); median progression-free survival (23·3 weeks [95% CI 19·6-30·4] vs 23·7 weeks [18·1-20·0]; hazard ratio [HR] for progression-free survival 1·28, 95% CI 0·99-1·65, p=0·06). The most common grade 3 and 4 adverse events were neutropenia (32 [25%] of 128 patients who received doxorubicin and 25 [20%] of 126 patients who received gemcitabine and docetaxel), febrile neutropenia (26 [20%] and 15 [12%]), fatigue (eight [6%] and 17 [14%]), oral mucositis (18 [14%] and two [2%]), and pain (ten [8%] and 13 [10%]). The three most common serious adverse events, representing 111 (39%) of all 285 serious adverse events recorded, were febrile neutropenia (27 [17%] of 155 serious adverse events in patients who received doxorubicin and 15 [12%] of 130 serious adverse events in patients who received gemcitabine and docetaxel, fever (18 [12%] and 19 [15%]), and neutropenia (22 [14%] and ten [8%]). 154 (60%) of 257 patients died in the intention-to-treat population: 74 (57%) of 129 patients in the doxorubicin group and 80 (63%) of 128 in the gemcitabine and docetaxel group. No deaths were related to the treatment, but two deaths were due to a combination of disease progression and treatment. INTERPRETATION: Doxorubicin should remain the standard first-line treatment for most patients with advanced soft-tissue sarcoma. These results provide evidence for clinicians to consider with their patients when selecting first-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK, Sarcoma UK, and Clinical Trial Unit Kantonsspital St Gallen.
Oncology (7)
Sarcoma (9), Neutropenia (4), Neoplasms (4), more mentions
Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 
Abstract: Purpose The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) produced an evidence-based guideline on radiation therapy in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) that was determined to be relevant to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) membership. After applying standard critical appraisal policy and endorsement procedures, ASCO chose to endorse the ASTRO guideline.
Oncology (6)
Squamous Cell Carcinoma (2), Neoplasms (2), more mentions
Gastroenterology
Abstract: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for about 90% of the 456,000 incident esophageal cancers each year... Keyword: Squamous cell carcinoma.
Oncology (1)
Squamous Cell Carcinoma (3), Esophageal Neoplasms (1), more mentions
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Hormonal and reproductive factors and incidence of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in a large, prospective cohort..
Squamous Cell Carcinoma (2), Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Diagnostic accuracy of teledermatology for nonmelanoma skin cancer: Can patients be referred directly for surgical management?.
Oncology (2)
Skin Neoplasms (2), more mentions
The British journal of dermatology
Evidence for an association between alcohol intake and an increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer..
Oncology (2)
Skin Neoplasms (2), more mentions
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
All Cancers Estimated Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence of All Cancers (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) in 2012..
Oncology (4)
Melanoma (2), Skin Neoplasms (2), more mentions
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
AbstractText: Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) of the ear are considered high risk... chart review of 649 consecutive patients treated with MMS at Mayo Clinic for primary cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) or squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the ear AbstractText: Nineteen percent of consecutively referred patients had NMSC of the ...
Squamous Cell Carcinoma (1), Basosquamous Carcinoma (1), Neoplasms (1), more mentions
JAMA dermatology
AbstractText: Protective effects of UV-B radiation against nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are exerted via signaling mechanisms involving the vitamin D ... who received a diagnosis of and were being treated for basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma (cases) and 100 individuals who were receiving treatment of a condition other than skin cancer (controls) at the dermatology clinics at the Kirklin Clinic of ...
Oncology (7), Dermatology (1)
Skin Neoplasms (7), Sunburn (2), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (1), more mentions
The British journal of dermatology
... tested the association between plasma 25(OH)D levels and non-melanoma skin cancer observationally, and between genetically determined 25(OH)D levels and non-melanoma skin cancer through an instrumental variable approach.Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of non-melanoma skin cancer were 3.27 (95%CI: 2.22;4.84) for plasma 25(OH ...
Oncology (20)
Skin Neoplasms (10), Melanoma (9), Neoplasms (1), more mentions
Clinical and experimental dermatology
Nicotinamide for prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers: a change in practice?.
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
Color Doppler Ultrasound Supports Early Diagnosis of Mixed High and Low Risk of Recurrence Subtypes in the Same Basal Cell Carcinoma Lesion..
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
Imiquimod 5% topical cream is approved for treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC. Data on the long-term efficacy and usage in other BCC subtypes are scarce.Evaluation of long-term safety and efficacy of topical imiquimod treatment in various BCC subtypes and locations, with individualized treatment duration.Histopathologically confirmed BCCs treated solely with topical imiquimod were identified retrospectively ...
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), Neoplasms (1), more mentions
16. Basal Cell Carcinoma in an Elderly Man.  
Date: 10/03/2017
JAMA internal medicine
Basal Cell Carcinoma in an Elderly Man..
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
Commentary on Reactive Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma Associated With Basal Cell Carcinoma..
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
Reactive Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma Associated With Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Histologic Mimicker of Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus..
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
The British journal of dermatology
Detecting basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) early and at relatively small sizes may expand therapeutic choices and enable less invasive treatment options. To this end, dermoscopy is a useful tool to diagnose BCC at early stages with high sensitivity and specificity.(1) Superficial BCCs have been shown to be independently associated with location on the trunk and extremities and nodular BCCs ...
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
Polyalkylimide and Invasive Growth of Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin..
Basal Cell Carcinoma (2), more mentions
1 2 3 4  | Next Page»