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Reproductive Endocrinology (Female)
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Your search returned 46 results
from the time period: last 90 days.
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Journal of the American College of Cardiology 
BACKGROUND: The longer term cardiovascular effects of fertility therapy are unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to summarize data linking fertility therapy with subsequent cardiovascular outcomes. METHODS: We systematically searched published reports for studies addressing the question "does fertility therapy increase the risk of longer term cardiovascular outcomes?" We included: 1) human studies; 2) case control, cohort, or randomized designs with 3) exposure to fertility therapy and 4) cardiovascular outcomes clearly reported; 5) presence of comparison group; 6) minimum 1-year follow-up; and 7) adjustment for age. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, titles, and full texts, and assessed study quality. We used the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects models to pool hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the following outcomes: acute cardiac event; stroke; venous thromboembolism; hypertension; and diabetes mellitus, comparing women who received fertility therapy with those who did not. RESULTS: Six observational studies met inclusion criteria including 41,910 women who received fertility therapy and 1,400,202 women who did not. There was no increased risk of a cardiac event (pooled HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.67 to 1.25; I(2) = 36.6%), or diabetes mellitus (pooled HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87 to 1.001; I(2) = 0%). Results were not pooled for hypertension (I(2) = 95.0%) and venous thromboembolism (I(2) = 82.3%). There was a trend toward higher risk of stroke (pooled HR: 1.25; 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.63; I(2) = 0%). CONCLUSIONS: The small number of studies and significant heterogeneity precludes definitive reassurance about the longer term cardiovascular safety of these treatments, particularly stroke. Future studies are needed to address ongoing knowledge gaps in this area.
Cardiovascular Diseases (9), Endocrine Disorders (2)
Hypertension (2), Diabetes Mellitus (2), Venous Thromboembolism (2), more mentions
European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
... about the efficacy of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in reducing endocrine and sexual problems in women who have undergone a risk-reducing salpingo ... symptoms were assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Endocrine Subscale (FACT-ES) and sexual functioning with the Sexual Activity Questionnaire (SAQ ... year after RRSO has beneficial effects in terms of minimising endocrine symptoms and sexual symptoms in premenopausal women who have undergone RRSO Keyword: BRCA ...
Oncology (3), Women's Health (1)
Neoplasms (2), Ovarian Neoplasms (1), Carcinoma (1), more mentions
Gynecologic oncology
BACKGROUND: Steroid hormones promote epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) growth and their receptor expression is associated with disease outcome. Hormone therapy is frequently used in pretreated EOC, but the magnitude of activity overall and by specific agents or tumor characteristics is unknown. METHODS: Clinical Benefit Rates (CBR) and deaths from clinical trials of endocrine agents were meta-analyzed. Summary estimates of CBR (SCBR) and Odd Ratio for death (SOR) were calculated according with type of drug, ER and PgR status, platinum resistance, line of therapy, tumor grade and tamoxifen dose. RESULTS: Fifty-three trials in 2490 patients were analyzed. Overall, SCBR was 41% (95%CI, 0.34-0.48) for any endocrine treatment, 43% (95%CI, 0.30-0.56) for tamoxifen, 39% (95%CI, 0.29-0.50) for aromatase inhibitors and 37% (95%CI, 0.26-0.48) for progestins. The SCBR for ER+ and/or PgR+ tumors was 46% (95%CI, 0.34-0.57) versus 37% (95%CI, 0.27-0.48) in tumors with unknown receptors and 55% in platinum sensitive (95%CI, 0.28-0.80) versus 40% (95%CI, 0.29-0.51) in platinum resistant tumors The SOR for death calculated from 6 out of 9 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed a reduced mortality with endocrine therapy (SOR=0.69, 95%CI, 0.50-0.97), with a possible tendency for a greater effect in first line and low grade tumors. The overall quality of the RCTs was low. CONCLUSIONS: The activity of endocrine therapy in advanced EOC is worth considering and seems to support large properly designed randomized trials in the first treatment of hormone sensitive EOC.
Oncology (2)
Neoplasms (6), Ovarian Neoplasms (2), more mentions
Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
Recent breast cancer treatment guidelines recommend that higher-risk premenopausal patients should receive ovarian function suppression (OFS) as part of adjuvant endocrine therapy. If chemotherapy is also given, it is uncertain whether to select concurrent or sequential OFS initiation.We analyzed 1872 patients enrolled in the randomized phase III TEXT and SOFT trials who received adjuvant chemotherapy for hormone receptor ...
Oncology (4)
Breast Neoplasms (4), more mentions
Fertility and sterility
This review presents opioid-sparing strategies for perioperative pain management among women undergoing reproductive surgeries and procedures. Recommendations are provided regarding the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, other adjunctive medications, and regional anesthetic blocks. Additional considerations for chronic opioid users or patients using opioid replacement or antagonist therapy are discussed.
Pain Management (4)
Opioid-Related Disorders (1), more mentions
Fertility and sterility
OBJECTIVE: To assess patient response rates to medical therapies used to treat endometriosis-associated pain. DESIGN: A systematic review with the use of Medline and Embase. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): Women receiving medical therapy to treat endometriosis. INTERVENTIONS(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The proportions of patients who: experienced no reduction in endometriosis-associated pain symptoms; had pain symptoms remaining at the end of the treatment period; had pain recurrence after treatment cessation; experienced an increase or no change in disease score during the study; were satisfied with treatment; and discontinued therapy owing to adverse events or lack of efficacy. The change in pain symptom severity experienced during and after treatment, as measured on the visual analog scale, was also assessed. RESULT(S): In total, 58 articles describing 125 treatment arms met the inclusion criteria. Data for the response of endometriosis-associated pain symptoms to treatment were presented in only 29 articles. The median proportions of women with no reduction in pain were 11%-19%; at the end of treatment, 5%-59% had pain remaining; and after follow-up, 17%-34% had experienced recurrence of pain symptoms after treatment cessation. After median study durations of 2-24 months, the median discontinuation rates due to adverse events or lack of efficacy were 5%-16%. CONCLUSION(S): Few studies of medical therapies for endometriosis report outcomes that are relevant to patients, and many women gain only limited or intermittent benefit from treatment.
Women's Health (8)
Endometriosis (8), more mentions
American journal of medical genetics. Part A
We report two patients with sagittal craniosynostosis, hypoplastic male genitalia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, thyroid abnormalities, and dysmorphic features which include short palpebral fissures and retrognathia. The clinical presentation of both patients was initially thought to be suggestive of Lin-Gettig syndrome (LGS), a multiple malformation syndrome associated with craniosynostosis that was initially reported in two brothers in 1990, with a third patient reported in 2003. Our first patient was subsequently found through exome sequencing to have a de novo mutation in KAT6B, c.4572dupT, p.(Thr1525Tyrfs*16). The second patient was ascertained as possible LGS, but KAT6B mutation testing was pursued clinically after the identification of the KAT6B mutation in Patient 1, and identified a de novo mutation, c.4205_4206delCT, p.(Ser1402Cysfs*5). The phenotypic spectrum of KAT6B mutations has been expanding since identification of KAT6B mutations in genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) and Say Barber Biesecker Young Simpson (SBBYS) syndrome patients. We show that craniosynostosis, which has not been previously reported in association with KAT6B mutations, may be part of the genitopatellar/Say Barber Biesecker Young Simpson spectrum. These two patients also further demonstrate the overlapping phenotypes of genitopatellar and SBBYS syndromes recently observed by others. Furthermore, we propose that it is possible that one or more of the previous cases of LGS may have also been due to mutation in KAT6B, and that LGS may actually be a variant within the KAT6B spectrum and not a distinct clinical entity.
Men's Health (1)
Craniosynostoses (4), Retrognathia (1), more mentions
Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
No Abstract Available
Women's Health (2)
Endometriosis (2), more mentions
The Journal of pathology
Endometrial epithelium is the presumed tissue of origin for both eutopic and endometriosis-derived clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas. We had previously hypothesized that the morphological, biological and clinical differences between these carcinomas are due to histotype-specific mutations. Although some mutations and genomic landscape features are more likely to be found in one of these histotypes, we were not able to identify a single class of mutations that was exclusively present in one histotype and not the other. This lack of genomic differences led us to an alternative hypothesis that these cancers could arise from distinct cells of origin within endometrial tissue, and it is the cellular context that accounts for their differences. In a proteomic screen, we have identified CTH as a marker for clear cell carcinoma, as it is expressed at high levels in clear cell carcinomas of the ovary and endometrium. In the current study, we analyze normal Müllerian tissues and find that cystathionine gamma lyase (CTH) is expressed in ciliated cells of endometrium (both eutopic endometrium and endometriosis) and fallopian tube. We then demonstrate that other ciliated cell markers are expressed in clear cell carcinomas whereas endometrial secretory cell markers are expressed in endometrioid carcinomas. The same differential staining of secretory and ciliated cells was demonstrable in a 3D organoid culture system, in which stem cells are stimulated to differentiate into an admixture of secretory and ciliated cells. These data suggest that endometrioid carcinomas are derived from cells of secretory cell lineage whereas clear cell carcinomas are derived from, or have similarities to, cells of ciliated cell lineage.
Women's Health (2)
Carcinoma (5), Endometrioid Carcinoma (4), Endometriosis (2), more mentions
Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
STUDY OBJECTIVE: A previous study described a technique of temporary suspension of the ovary to the abdominal wall using nylon suture (Abuzeid et al 2002). The aim of this study is to describe a modified technique of temporary suspension of the ovary to the fascia of the anterior abdominal wall after operative laparoscopy for advanced stage endometriosis to reduce postoperative adhesion formation. DESIGN: Video illustrating this modified technique of ovarian suspension SETTING: Academic affiliated community medical center PATIENTS: This patient underwent temporary suspension of the right ovary, using 3-0 plain catgut suture, after operative laparoscopy for advanced stage endometriosis (Stage III ASRM classification). INTERVENTIONS: Temporary suspension of the right ovary to the fascia of the abdominal wall at the conclusion of operative laparoscopy using dissolvable suture (3-0 plain catgut suture). MEASUREMENTS & MAIN RESULTS: This patient was found to have stage III endometriosis. Right ovariolysis was performed. CO2 laser was utilized to evaporate spots of endometriosis on the surface of the ovary, ovarian fossa, and the wall of a small endometrioma. A 3-0 plain catgut suture was placed in the right ovarian ligament and the needle was cut and removed from the peritoneal cavity. The ends of the sutures were brought out of the peritoneal cavity through a 3 mm skin incision using Endo Close device. The suture was tied over the fascia while allowing CO2 gas out of the peritoneal cavity to ensure that the suture remained under tension and the ovary is well suspended without touching the abdominal wall. The suture was used to elevate the ovary away from the ovarian fossa to avoid recurrence of adhesions between it and the ovary. Postoperatively the patient did well and was discharged home on oral pain medication on the same day of surgery. No postoperative complications were reported as a result of the suspension procedure. The patient had an uneventful recovery. CONCLUSION: This modified approach of temporary ovarian suspension to the fascia of the anterior abdominal wall appears to be simple, safe, and easy to learn.
Women's Health (4)
Endometriosis (5), more mentions
Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
No Abstract Available
Endometriosis (2), more mentions
Reproductive sciences (Thousand Oaks, Calif.)
BACKGROUND: Androgenic compounds have been implicated in induction of endometrial atrophy yet the mechanisms of androgen effects on human endometrium have not been well studied. We hypothesized that androgens may promote their endometrial effects via modulation of progesterone receptor (PR) expression. METHODS: Proliferative phase endometrial samples were collected at the time of hysterectomy. We evaluated the effect of the potent androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on endometrial PR expression by treating human endometrial explants, endometrial stromal cells, and Ishikawa cells with DHT. Ishikawa cells were also treated with DHT ± the androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide. The PR-B, total PR messenger RNA (mRNA), and PR protein expression were assessed. Expression of cyclin D1 and D2 was checked as markers of cell proliferation. RESULTS: As expected, estradiol induced PR expression in isolated stromal cells, endometrial epithelial cells, and tissue explants. The DHT treatment also resulted in increased PR expression in endometrial explants and Ishikawa cells but not in stromal cells. Further, protein levels of both nuclear PR isoforms (PR-A and PR-B) were induced with the DHT treatment. Although flutamide treatment alone did not affect PR expression, flutamide diminished androgen-induced upregulation of PR in both endometrial explants and Ishikawa cells. Although estradiol induced both cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 mRNA, DHT did not induce these markers of cell proliferation. CONCLUSION: Androgens may mediate endometrial effects through upregulation of PR gene and protein expression. Endometrial PR upregulation by androgens is mediated, at least in part, through AR.
Women's Health (2)
Endometriosis (2), Atrophy (1), more mentions
Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To introduce a method for rapid assessment of endometriotic tissues using direct mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study. DESIGN CLASSIFICATION: II 2. SETTING: Department of Operative Gynecology of the Research Centre for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology. PATIENTS: Fifty patients with ovarian cysts and peritoneal endometriosis who underwent laparoscopic surgery between 2014 and 2016. INTERVENTION: Differences in mass spectrometric profiles of ectopic endometrium (endometriosis) and eutopic endometrium were analyzed for each patient in combination with morpho-histological evaluation. The lipidomic approach was applied using a direct high-resolution mass spectrometry method. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Out of 148 metabolites, 15 showed significant differences between endometriotic tissue and the comparison healthy endometrium of the same patient, considered as a control in this study. Main lipids prevalent in endometriotic tissues were: phosphoethanolamine (PE O-20:0), sphingomyelin (SM 34:1), diglycerides (DG 44:9), phosphatidylcholines (PC 32:1, PC O-36:3, PC 38:7, PC 38:6, PC 40:8, PC 40:7, PC 40:6, PC 40:9, PC O-42:1), and triglycerides (TG 41:2, TG 49:4, TG 52:3). Using PLS-DA models, MS demonstrated that the lipidomic profile of endometriotic tissue (peritoneal endometriosis and ovarian endometrioma) was clearly separated from eutopic endometrium, indicating tissue-type differentiation. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that direct mass spectrometry may play an important role for endometriotic tissue identification. Such approach has potential utility for real-time tissue determination and differentiation during surgical treatment. Lipids of three important classes, sphingolipids, phospholipids, and the fatty acids, di- and tri-glycerides, were identified. Validation is required to determine whether these lipids can be used to discriminate between patients with endometriosis and those with other gynecological diseases.
Women's Health (6)
Endometriosis (8), Ovarian Cysts (1), more mentions
American journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Although non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can alleviate menstrual pain, about 18% of women with dysmenorrhea are unresponsive, leaving them and their physicians to pursue less well-studied strategies. The goal of this review is to provide a background for treating menstrual pain when first-line options fail. Research on menstrual pain and failure of similar drugs in the antiplatelet category has suggested potential mechanisms underlying non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug resistance. Based on these mechanisms, alternative options may be helpful for refractory cases. This review also identifies key pathways in need of further study to optimize menstrual pain treatment.
Women's Health (6)
Adenomyosis (1), Endometriosis (1), more mentions
BMJ open
OBJECTIVES: The aim of study was to compare the accuracy between rectal water contrast transvaginal ultrasound (RWC-TVS) and double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) in evaluating the bowel endometriosis presence as well as its extent. DESIGN AND SETTING: 198 patients at reproductive age with suspicious bowel endometriosis were included. Physicians in two groups specialised at endometriosis performed RWC-TVS as well as DCBE before laparoscopy and both groups were blinded to other groups' results. Findings from RWC-TVS or DCBE were compared with histological results. The severity of experienced pain severity through RWC-TVS or DCBE was assessed by an analogue scale of 10 cm. RESULTS: In total, 110 in 198 women were confirmed to have endometriosis nodules in the bowel by laparoscopy as well as histopathology. For bowel endometriosis diagnosis, DCBE and RWC-TVS demonstrated sensitivities of 96.4% and 88.2%, specificities of 100% and 97.3%, positive prediction values of 100% and 98.0%, negative prediction values of 98.0% and 88.0%, accuracies of 98.0% and 92.4%, respectively. DCBE was related to more tolerance than RWC-TVS. CONCLUSIONS: RWC-TVS and DCBE demonstrated similar accuracies in the bowel endometriosis diagnosis; however, patients showed more tolerance for RWC-TVS than those with DCBE.
Women's Health (8)
Endometriosis (8), more mentions
European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology
OBJECTIVE: Endometriosis is a common gynaecological disease, associated with severe pelvic pain and reduced fertility; however, molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are able to identify genetic loci, which can play significant role during endometriosis development. AIM: The study aimed at localisation of new genes and chromosomal loci, the nucleotide variants of which determine the level of susceptibility to endometriosis. STUDY DESIGN: Blood samples from 171 patients with endometriosis were used as material for studies. The patients were recruited to the study at the Department of Operative Gynaecology of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz. A control group (n=2934) came from the POPULOUS collection registered at Biobank Lab, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. DNA of the patients with endometriosis was compared with DNA of women free from that disease, the comparison being supported by GWAS. RESULTS: Genome-wide significant correlation was identified between one new, not previously described, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10129516, localised on chromosome 14 in intergenic region between PARP1P2 and RHOJ genes (p=1.44×10(-10), OR=3.104, 95% CI=2.329-4.136) and endometriosis. We have also identified significant association with endometriosis of 18 SNPs localised on chromosome 6 in position range 31883957 - 32681631 (C2 and HLA-DRA genes region) with the lowest observed p value for rs644045 in C2 gene (p=2.04×10(-8), OR=1.955, 95% CI=1.541-2.480). CONCLUSION: Reported GWAS identified the novel loci associated with endometriosis in Polish women, not previously reported. The most interesting observation shown in our study are regions associated with susceptibility to endometriosis of loci located near C2, HLA-DRA and RHOJ genes. RESULTS: of that study did not correspond to previously published data about polymorphism in that regions and further evaluations are necessary in groups with higher numbers of patients to explain whether the above-mentioned genetic variant may be the risk factor for pathogenesis of endometriosis.
Women's Health (12)
Endometriosis (12), more mentions
Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
STUDY QUESTION: Is it possible to develop a validated score that can identify women with Bowel Endometriosis Syndrome (BENS) and be used to monitor the effect of medical and surgical treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: The BENS score can be used to identify women with BENS and to monitor the effect of medical and surgical treatment of women suffering from bowel endometriosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease with extensive variation in anatomical and clinical presentation, and symptoms do not always correspond to the disease burden. Current endometriosis scoring systems are mainly based on anatomical and surgical findings. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: The score was developed and validated from a cohort of 525 women with medically or surgically treated bowel endometriosis from Aarhus and Copenhagen University Hospitals, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING AND METHODS: Patients filled in questionnaires on pelvic pain, quality of life (QoL) and urinary, sexual and bowel function. Items were selected for the final score using clinical and statistical criteria. The chosen variables were included in a multivariate analysis. Individual score values were designated items to form the BENS score, which was divided into 'no BENS', 'minor BENS' and 'major BENS.' Internal and external validations were performed. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The six most important items were 'pelvic pain', 'use of analgesics', 'dyschezia', 'straining to urinate', 'fecal urgency' and 'satisfaction with sexual life'. The range of the BENS score (0-28) was divided into 0-8 (no BENS), 9-16 (minor BENS) and 17-28 (major BENS). External validation showed a significant association between BENS score and QoL (P = 0.0001). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The BENS scoring system is limited by the fact that it was developed from a single endometriosis unit in Denmark, making it susceptible to social, cultural and demographic bias. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: It is the first endometriosis classification system to be based directly on the symptomatology of the patient. Validation in other languages will promote comparison of treatments and results across borders. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): No external funding was either sought or obtained for this study. A.F. is an investigator for Bayer, outside this work.
Women's Health (9)
Endometriosis (9), more mentions
Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
STUDY QUESTION: What factors affect the mental health of women with endometriosis? SUMMARY ANSWER: Not only pelvic pain, but also individual characteristics (i.e. self-esteem, body esteem and emotional self-efficacy), time from diagnosis and intimate relationship status influence the psychological health of endometriosis patients. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The negative impact of endometriosis on mental health has been widely demonstrated by the research literature, along with the fact that presence and severity of pelvic pain are associated with anxiety and depression. However, endometriosis is a complex multidimensional disease and factors other than pelvic pain, including individual differences, may contribute to explain the variability in women's mental health. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This cross-sectional study was conducted between 2015 and 2017 at an Italian academic department of obstetrics and gynaecology. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: A total of 210 consecutive endometriosis patients (age: 36.7 ± 7.0 years) were included. Demographic and endometriosis-related information was collected. Individual differences were assessed using validated measures evaluating self-esteem, body esteem and emotional self-efficacy. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) were used to evaluate mental health. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Based on the extant literature, we identified three categories of putative predictors (demographic variables, endometriosis-related factors and individual differences i.e. 'self'), whose psychological impact was examined using a hierarchical multiple regression approach. Being in a stable relationship (coded 1 ['yes'] or 0 ['no']) was associated with decreased rumination (RRS: β = -0.187; P = 0.002). A shorter time from diagnosis was associated with greater anxiety (HADS-A: β = -0.177; P = 0.015). Pelvic pain severity and 'self' were associated with all mental health variables (Ps < 0.01). Greater self-esteem, body esteem, and emotional self-efficacy were correlated with better psychological outcomes (Ps < 0.01). LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: Sexual functioning, pregnancy, infertility, cultural differences and gender beliefs have been found to be important in women with endometriosis. In our regression model, we did not test the psychological impact of these variables and this should be acknowledged as an important limitation. Moreover, the cross-sectional (rather than longitudinal) nature of this study does not allow a full examination of the temporal relationship between endometriosis and psychological outcomes. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Factors other than pelvic pain can significantly affect the mental health of women with endometriosis, and the role of individual differences requires further investigation. Targeted multidisciplinary interventions should include evaluation and enhancement of self-esteem and self-efficacy to improve women's psychological health. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): None. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Not applicable.
Women's Health (12)
Endometriosis (12), Infertility (1), more mentions
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) for treating abdominal wall endometrioses (AWE). DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in China. POPULATION: Patients with abdominal wall endometriosis. METHODS: From August 2010 to April 2014, 32 patients with AWE were treated with USgHIFU in our hospital. USgHIFU treatment was performed with the Model JC-200 High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapeutic System. The symptom relief and the adverse effects were evaluated after USgHIFU ablation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: USgHIFU as a new treatment option for patients with AWE. RESULTS: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed that all lesions were successfully ablated with USgHIFU. The follow-up results showed that the average volume of AWE lesions at 6 months after USgHIFU was significantly smaller than that before treatment (2.80 ± 0.12 versus 1.33 ± 0.31 cm(3) ). The pain scores at 6 months after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment (6.80 ± 2.64 versus 1.80 ± 0.3). The non-perfused volume (indicative of successful ablation) was measured in all patients immediately after treatment, ranging from 0.9 to 2.1 cm(3) (median: 1.6 cm(3) ), and the fractional ablation ranged from 87% to 100% (median: 94%). Local oedema was observed in these patients, lasting for 1-3 days only. No severe complications occurred during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our study, USgHIFU ablation is a safe and effective method for treating AWE. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: As a non-invasive treatment technique, HIFU could be used to treat abdominal wall endometriosis.
Women's Health (4)
Endometriosis (4), Neoplasms (1), more mentions
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic outcomes of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and surgical treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTING: Gynaecological department of a teaching hospital in China. POPULATION: Patients with abdominal wall endometriosis. METHODS: Among the 51 patients, 23 patients were treated with ultrasound-guided HIFU and 28 patients with surgery. Pain relief and the size change of the nodule after each management were evaluated 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, respectively. The hospital stay and blood loss were also compared. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Difference between HIFU and surgical treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups in the pain relief in 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, respectively. The hospital stay was clearly shorter in the HIFU group than in the surgery group. Change in nodules was more remarkable in the group treated with surgery; no palpable nodules existed in most patients in the surgery group. HIFU had more advantages over surgery, such as no blood loss, no new scar, no anaesthesia and lower pain score immediately after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, it appears that either HIFU or surgery is safe and effective in treating patients with AWE in short-term. Compared with surgery, HIFU treatment for AWE has the advantages of shorter hospital stay, no blood loss, no new scar, no anaesthesia and a lower immediate pain score. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Either HIFU or surgical treatment is safe and effective in treating patients with AWE. HIFU has the advantages of a less invasive procedure and shorter hospital stay.
Women's Health (5)
Endometriosis (5), more mentions
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